Early Admissions Now Open for 2020-21!

We are now accepting applications for 2020-2021. The Early Admissions deadline is January 31, 2020. (You are still welcome to send an application after that date.)

Classes fill up fast, so don’t delay!

To apply, follow a few simple steps:

1) Download and print the application.

2) Fill out the main form, including a description of your son. Ask your son to write an essay telling us why he would like to join our adventure. We would also love to have a picture of him!

3) Give a recommendation form to two teachers and to your pastor. Ask them to either mail it to us or to give it back to you. If you homeschool and your son has no other teacher, we are happy to accept the recommendation of non-family adults who know him well.

4) Ask your son’s guidance office to send us his transcript for grades seven through the present. If you would rather send us copies of his report cards, we will gladly accept them. Homeschoolers, please send a record of your son’s studies and any grades you may have assigned.

5) Copy records of your son’s Baptism and Confirmation (if he has been confirmed).

6) Mail everything to:

Admissions
135 St. Gregory’s Pl.
Elmhurst Twp., PA 18444

As soon as we receive the application we will let you know. Complete applications will be evaluated by the end of February.

We welcome your calls or email queries because we understand what a big decision it is to send your beloved son to boarding school. Call 571-295-6244 or email Mrs. Beebe, Admissions Director at kbeebe@gregorythegreatacademy.org. No concern or question is trivial when you are discerning your son’s education and formation!

All Saints and All Souls Days

The mission of Catholic education, the mission of Gregory the Great Academy, is arguably the most important one in the world—to make citizens for the next world. Dr. John Senior, the teacher whose educational methods and ideas informed the origins of our community, described Christian culture as the cultivation of saints. During this time of year when we honor all the saints and all those souls who will become saints, we are reminded of this truth and, again, honored that we have been given the incredible opportunity to labor in this bright corner of the vineyard and tend to our harvest. Teaching is like tending, like gardening—constantly requiring weeding, watching, and waiting. The faculty at Gregory the Great bear this ever in mind as we engage in the art of teaching and, God willing, in the work of cultivating saints. There are 63 spirited boys at the Academy, each one giving their all to the good school that God has provided for them. May it prove their path to heaven.

Robin Hood Days 2019

Life isn’t all beer and skittles,” wrote Thomas Hughes in Tom Brown’s Schooldays, “but beer and skittles, or something better of the same sort, must form a good part of every Englishman’s education.” The things that often best define a society are the things done when unconstrained by the necessities of society. Leisure is the basis of culture, to borrow Josef Pieper’s title, and what people do in their leisure time is, therefore, central to self-identity and to the quality of life. Education can, by this principle, be either enhanced or undone when school is out. Amusements and activities are a vital aspect of formation, and thus the “beer and skittles” of life have a serious part to play in a serious education.

In Hughes’ words:

Don’t let reformers of any sort think that they are going really to lay hold of the working boys and young men of England by any educational grapnel whatever, which isn’t some bona fide equivalent for the games of the old country… something to put in the place of the back-swording and wrestling and racing; something to try the muscles of men’s bodies, and the endurance of their hearts, and to make them rejoice in their strength. In all the new-fangled comprehensive plans which I see, this is all left out…

Every year at Gregory the Great Academy, there is an event called Robin Hood Days, where the students and faculty process with bows, belts, knives, and flags under the greenwood tree where all live together as merry men for several days. After setting up elaborate campsites, an outdoor kitchen, and a chapel, the boys feast on pit-roasted meats washed down with birch beer as they compete in a series of woodland skittles: archery tournaments, knife and axe throwing, whittling, wrestling, quarterstaff bouts, fire-starting races, and old Native American relay games.

All this may sound unusual for boys of our times to be doing, but to experience it is the most natural thing in the world. Laughter, songs, climbing trees, fires, food and drink, stories, games, hearty cheers, the occasional bloody nose, the ever-accompanying helping hand up, communal prayer, conversation beneath the stars. This is leisure, and it is profoundly educational. Hughes was right — beer and skittles, or their betters, must form a good part of any education.